World As North Korean threat grows, Hawaii prepares for nuclear attack

07:36  14 november  2017
07:36  14 november  2017 Source:   Los Angeles Times

Why no North Korea missile tests in two months?

  Why no North Korea missile tests in two months? North Korea has gone two months without test firing a missile, the longest such dry spell this year. Is it reason for hope?

Fears of terrorism grew more urgent and, for many younger Americans, being on notice for nuclear war became a relic of the past. Amid increasing North Korean threats against the U.S., Hawaii has launched the most aggressive effort in the country to prepare for attack .

Fears of terrorism grew more urgent and, for many younger Americans, being on notice for nuclear war became a relic of the past. Amid increasing North Korean threats against the U.S., Hawaii has launched the most aggressive effort in the country to prepare for attack .

Bert Hartsock carries his 15-month-old daughter, Maya, on his shoulders as they and his wife, Tia, watch the surf at Makapuu Beach in Waimanalo, Hawaii on Saturday, Sept. 3, 2016.© (AP Photo/Jennifer Sinco Kelleher) Bert Hartsock carries his 15-month-old daughter, Maya, on his shoulders as they and his wife, Tia, watch the surf at Makapuu Beach in Waimanalo, Hawaii on Saturday, Sept. 3, 2016.

For decades, the wail of the nuclear bomb warning siren was ubiquitous in U.S. cities. Public service commercials drilled the "duck and cover" mantra into the minds of Americans, and the possibility of a Soviet attack was always around the corner.

But after the Cold War, most places abandoned their sirens. Fears of terrorism grew more urgent and, for many younger Americans, being on notice for nuclear war became a relic of the past.

Trump Arrives in Seoul, Bringing Him Close to Kim's Doorstep

  Trump Arrives in Seoul, Bringing Him Close to Kim's Doorstep President Donald Trump arrived in South Korea on Tuesday for a two-day visit, bringing him near North Korean leader Kim Jong Un on a stop that will also feature talks on a trade deal he says hurts U.S. workers. The second leg of his five-nation Asia trip includes a meeting with U.S. troops, a joint press briefing with President Moon Jae-in and an address to South Korea’s parliament. In contrast to Trump’s warm relationship with Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe, his dealings with Moon got off to rocky start due to differences over trade and dialogue with North Korea.Donald and Melania Trump arrive in Osan, outside of Seoul on Nov. 7.

Hawaii prepares as North Korea threat grows . More than 70 years later, the threat of a nuclear strike is being assessed and planned for just in case, although US officials dialed back rhetoric on Wednesday.

Hawaii prepares as North Korea threat grows . We will all be wiped out,’ or they say ‘Why prepare for a nuclear attack (that) will never happen?'” Editor of Local Korean Newspaper Says ‘War Is Not the Answer’ About Growing Tensions With North Korea .

That's no longer the case in Hawaii.

Amid increasing North Korean threats against the U.S., Hawaii has launched the most aggressive effort in the country to prepare for attack. TV commercials warn the state's 1.4 million residents to "get inside, stay inside" if a bomb drops. State officials are holding online forums and flying between islands for town halls to field questions from residents.

On Dec. 1, the nuclear attack warning siren will be heard in the state for the first time in more than three decades.

A North Korean bomb is "a major, major concern," Vern Miyagi, the administrator of the Hawaii Emergency Management Agency, said recently during a seminar he held for residents in a packed meeting room at the state's Department of Defense offices in Honolulu. He painted a stark picture of what emergency officials expect if a nuclear missile was to reach Oahu.

China sticks by ‘freeze-for-freeze’ Korea de-escalation proposal, contradicting Trump

  China sticks by ‘freeze-for-freeze’ Korea de-escalation proposal, contradicting Trump The U.S. policy to entice North Korea away from its nuclear and missile program is not entirely clear.The proposal calls for North Korea to freeze its missile and nuclear tests in return for the United States and South Korea suspending their annual joint military exercises. On Wednesday, Trump suggested Chinese President Xi Jinping had acknowledged to him that the plan was a non-starter.

As North Korean threat grows , Hawaii prepares for nuclear attack . For decades, the wail of the nuclear bomb warning siren was ubiquitous in U.S. cities.

The Hawaii Tribune Herald reported on Tuesday that Hawaii is the first state to enact an emergency campaign to prepare for any nuclear attack by North Korea . Hawaii Prepares for Missile Threat JUNE 22, 2009. U.S. Fortifies Hawaii ’s Defenses Against North Korean Arms JUNE 18, 2009.

"We are talking about 50,000 to 120,000 trauma and burn causalities together with nearly 18,000 fatalities," said Miyagi, the state's chief expert on natural disasters and the North Korean threat. The expected target: Pearl Harbor.

North Korea's on-again-off-again status as a state sponsor of terrorism

  North Korea's on-again-off-again status as a state sponsor of terrorism How North Korea was designated a state sponsor of terrorism, then undesignated and now redesignated.“It should have happened a long time ago,” Trump told reporters. “It should have happened years ago.

Hawaii Begins Distributing Nuclear Attack Preparedness Guides to public after North Korean FM tells UN missile attack against US inevitable. Hawaii prepares as North Korea threat grows .

As North Korean threat grows , Hawaii prepares for nuclear attack . Hold me David I'm scared.

Kim Jong-un et al. wearing military uniforms posing for a photo: Undated photo from North Korean News Agency shows North Korean leader Kim Jong-un visiting a Korean People's Army unit, in an undisclosed location, North Korea. Photo released August 2017.© Balkis Press/Abaca Press/TNS Undated photo from North Korean News Agency shows North Korean leader Kim Jong-un visiting a Korean People's Army unit, in an undisclosed location, North Korea. Photo released August 2017.

More accustomed to educating residents about hurricanes and tsunamis than atomic and hydrogen bombs, Miyagi displayed slides illustrating the potential effects to the island from a 100-kiloton nuclear bomb detonated 1,000 feet above Honolulu. The explosion would hit an area about eight miles in diameter, he said. Ninety percent of people would survive the direct impact but would have to contend with nuclear fallout and navigating a crippled island.

"We anticipate severe damage to Daniel K. Inouye International Airport, Hickam Air Force Base and Honolulu Harbor and Pearl Harbor. There will be widespread structural fires and building collapses. There will be damage to hospitals and government buildings," Miyagi said. He left open the possibility that other islands could be hit.

Hawaii has largely avoided North Korea's crosshairs in recent months, though the nation has made threats against the state over the years. Concerns grew in 2009, when the Obama administration said then-leader Kim Jong Il could send a missile toward Hawaii and the U.S. military increased preparations in Honolulu.

Mine workers, idyllic landscapes, tigers: North Korean artists have made tens of millions of dollars for Pyongyang

  Mine workers, idyllic landscapes, tigers: North Korean artists have made tens of millions of dollars for Pyongyang Many of the artworks come from the Mansudae Art Studio in Pyongyang, one of the largest art production entities in the world. Mansudae is run by the North Korean government and it employs about 4,000 people—only around a quarter of them are artists. It’s the only institution that can portray North Korea’s ruling family and it also produces propaganda posters, ceramics, embroidery, and some giant Socialist Realism statues. Its official overseas gallery “Mansudae Art Museum” is in Beijing’s art district 798 Art Zone and has been holding exhibitions since 2009.

Donald Trump will arrive in Hawaii later as the islands step up emergency preparations to deal with a possible nuclear strike from North Korea . Public meetings are being held to advise people on how to be prepared for an attack and its aftermath.

OFFICIALS in Hawaii have have told islanders to prepare for a nuclear attack from North Korea , saying it was time to take the threat from King Jong-un "seriously". By Ross Logan.

But fears have further increased amid a tense standoff between President Donald Trump and North Korean leader Kim Jong Un. The U.S. military has recently focused on Guam, a U.S. territory much closer to North Korea that Kim has threatened.

The hurdles for North Korea are high. It's not clear that the reclusive country has the technology yet to get a bomb to Hawaii. With about 4,600 miles between Pyongyang and Honolulu, the islands are a difficult target. In addition, Pacific Command, the U.S. military's headquarters for the Asia-Pacific region, ran tests over the summer and says it is ready to intercept an intercontinental ballistic missile.

"Any attack against us is suicide," Miyagi said, because U.S. retaliation against North Korea would be far greater.

Still, preparations are in full swing in Honolulu and elsewhere in the state. The new 50-second warning siren will follow a tsunami alert system that is tested monthly. State officials are telling residents to gather enough food to be able to remain indoors for as little as a few hours and as long as two weeks if a bomb hits.

"Right now we consider the threat to be very unlikely. But it doesn't matter," said Lt. Col. Charles Anthony, a spokesman for the Hawaii Department of Defense. "If North Korea uses an intercontinental ballistic missile, from launch to impact in Hawaii is approximately 20 minutes."

North Korea's first lady Ri Sol-ju remains a mystery

  North Korea's first lady Ri Sol-ju remains a mystery Taking a break from waging a war of words with U.S. President Donald Trump, North Korean dictator Kim Jong Un, made a rare public propaganda appearance with his wife “Comrade Ri Sol-ju”Part of the reason for the mystery around Comrade Ri Sol-ju is because she is rarely seen in public, with her most recent public appearance being last month.

Hawaii prepares as North Korea threat grows . More than 70 years later, the threat of a nuclear strike is being assessed and planned for just in case, although US officials dialed back rhetoric on Wednesday.

Hawaii officials have reportedly been urging residents to prepare for a nuclear attack , the Ri's comments followed Kim's extraordinary statement lashing out at President Trump, calling the American leader "deranged" and vowing that Trump would "pay dearly" for his threat to destroy North Korea .

Anthony said the state could give residents a warning from 12 to 15 minutes, rendering old fallout shelters mostly useless because they are too far away.

At a recent information session in Honolulu, the 40 or so people who showed up were eager to find out more about the prospect of nuclear destruction, and how they could help their families and neighbors.

Joe Brown, a 61-year-old Honolulu resident who lives close to Pearl Harbor, asked whether the state's alert system of text and radio messages in addition to the sirens would jam cellphone and broadcast towers. The answer: possibly, though broadcast stations on other islands could probably still transmit messages.

"I believe the risk is very low. However, we need to know what will happen," Brown said.

"We have 5-gallon water containers at home and dried foods; we're somewhat prepared and try to always be more prepared for disaster," he said. "But, you know, with the president and what he tweets and says, we do get a little more concerned."

Lourdes Scheibert, a 66-year-old who lives near downtown Honolulu, said she first began readying her home for an attack after tensions rose during the Obama administration. She has thick plastic sheets to cover her windows and had loaded up on masks to filter the air. A veteran of three hurricanes, she owns a prepackaged bucket with a 30-day supply of dried food for her family of five.

"You can't depend on the government to help you. If you want to help yourself, you need to take care of yourself and your neighbors," Scheibert said. "I'm watching the news. I have the alert system on my phone. I'm just waiting to see if things come about, though I hope they don't at all."

Visit the Los Angeles Times at www.latimes.com

North Korea won't strike U.S. first despite threats, experts say .
Despite repeated threats to incinerate the United States with its nuclear weapons, North Korea takes pains to note it won't strike first.The over-the-top rhetoric is often misinterpreted in the West, but North Korea has been consistent in saying it is developing a nuclear arsenal solely to ward off a first-strike by the U.S. military, said Van Jackson, an analyst at the Center for Strategic Studies at Victoria University in Wellington, New Zealand.

Source: http://au.pressfrom.com/news/world/-46535-as-north-korean-threat-grows-hawaii-prepares-for-nuclear-attack/

—   Share news in the SOC. Networks

Topical videos:

This is interesting!