Tech & Science Secret spy satellite fails to keep orbit after SpaceX launch

06:54  09 january  2018
06:54  09 january  2018 Source:   New York Daily News

U.S. spy satellite believed destroyed after failing to reach orbit: officials

  U.S. spy satellite believed destroyed after failing to reach orbit: officials A U.S. spy satellite that was launched from Cape Canaveral, Florida, aboard a SpaceX rocket on Sunday failed to reach orbit and is assumed to be a total loss, two U.S. officials briefed on the mission said on Monday. The classified intelligence satellite, built by Northrop Grumman Corp, failed to separate from the second stage of the Falcon 9 rocket and is assumed to have broken up or plunged into the sea, said the two officials, who spoke on condition of anonymity.The satellite is assumed to be "a write-off," one of the officials said.The presumed loss of the satellite was first reported by the Wall Street Journal.

The launch of “Zuma,” the costly top secret spy satellite aboard SpaceX ’s Falcon 9 rocket, was a bust, according to a report Monday. The mysterious payload failed to keep a low orbit and likely plunged through the Earth’s atmosphere after being launched Sunday from Florida's Space Coast

BREAKING: Top secret SpaceX Zuma mission ‘total loss’ as US spy satellite 'disappears'. GETTY. SpaceX Zuma mission has been branded a failure after it failed to make orbit . SpaceX CUTS feed to second stage of launch to keep TOP SECRET Zuma payload unknown.

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SpaceX denies Falcon rocket caused secret Zuma mission failure

  SpaceX denies Falcon rocket caused secret Zuma mission failure There were reports that the Zuma mission may have ended in failure, but SpaceX said its Falcon 9 rocket "did everything correctly."“Information published that is contrary to this statement is categorically false,” said Gwynne Shotwell, chief operating officer of Hawthorne, Calif.-based SpaceX. “Due to the classified nature of the payload, no further comment is possible.

The payload for the National Reconnaissance Office, which makes and operates spy satellites for the SpaceX also has a pair of launch contracts coming up for the Air Force to send GPS satellites into orbit . SpaceX 's first reused rocket is back in port, five days after launching a satellite .

Top secret spy satellite missing after ‘botched’ launch . SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket launches secret Zuma payload into orbit 1:12.

The launch of “Zuma,” the costly top secret spy satellite aboard SpaceX’s Falcon 9 rocket, was a bust, according to a report Monday.

The mysterious payload failed to keep a low orbit and likely plunged through the Earth’s atmosphere after being launched Sunday from Florida's Space Coast, the Wall Street Journal reported, citing sources close to the bungled mission.

The purpose of the government spacecraft is not known but it was believed to be worth billions, the paper reported.

The secret satellite was launched aboard a SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket, seen launching Sunday night from launches from Cape Canaveral. © Craig Bailey/AP The secret satellite was launched aboard a SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket, seen launching Sunday night from launches from Cape Canaveral. Officials with SpaceX, the private aerospace manufacturer led by Tesla mogul Elon Musk, declined to comment on the nature of the mission but said the Falcon 9 rocket “performed nominally.”

SpaceX denies Falcon rocket caused secret Zuma mission failure

  SpaceX denies Falcon rocket caused secret Zuma mission failure There were reports that the Zuma mission may have ended in failure, but SpaceX said its Falcon 9 rocket "did everything correctly."“Information published that is contrary to this statement is categorically false,” said Gwynne Shotwell, chief operating officer of Hawthorne, Calif.-based SpaceX. “Due to the classified nature of the payload, no further comment is possible.

- The U.S. National Reconnaissance Office (NRO) isn't saying much about its new spy satellite , now scheduled to blast off on a SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket Monday (May 1), but it will be heading into low-Earth orbit SpaceX Launching Top- Secret Zuma Satellite for US Government This Week.

A U.S. spy satellite that was launched from Cape Canaveral, Florida, aboard a SpaceX rocket on Sunday failed to reach orbit and is assumed to be a total loss, two U.S. officials briefed on the mission said on Monday.

Zuma was originally slated for a November launch but was plagued by delays. Last week, SpaceX hailed its rocket and the Zuma spacecraft as “healthy and go for launch" at the Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Cape Canaveral.

Northrop Grumman, the Virginia-based company that built the satellite, declined to comment on the satellite's failure.

SpaceX says its Falcon 9 rocket © Craig Bailey/AP SpaceX says its Falcon 9 rocket "performed nominally" after Sunday's launch.

Delays and safety concerns mar NASA’s plans to fly astronauts on commercial spacecraft .
NASA’s ambitious initiative to fly astronauts on commercial spacecraft continues to suffer from schedule delays, as well as questions regarding the program’s safety — and Congress isn’t happy about it. As part of the program, two companies — Boeing and SpaceX — are developing spacecraft to ferry NASA astronauts to and from the International Space Station. When these two companies were selected by NASA back in 2014, the goal was to start flying crews to the station as early as 2017. But 2017 has come and gone, and the target dates keep moving.

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