Money We care less about what we're paid than knowing why we're paid that rate

08:32  13 november  2017
08:32  13 november  2017 Source:   MSN

Is it time to fix your power costs?

  Is it time to fix your power costs? Few moments can induce greater sweaty-palmed terror in householders then approaching the letter box and finding inside a bill from the power company. Depending on which state you live in prices rose up to 20 percent on the first of July. And this at a time when wages are increasing at less than two percent on average.No wonder our greatest worry as a nation is power prices.But there is a little-used option to keep your power prices locked in. Fixed-rate energy plans mean you pay the one rate for power over the life of the contract.

Whether our jobs pay us fairly matters a lot less to us than how well we feel we ’ re getting paid —and because we ’ re in the dark about why we ’ re paid what we are, most of us think we ’ re getting underpaid.

Whether our jobs pay us fairly matters a lot less to us than how well we feel we ’ re getting paid , a new survey has found—and because we ’ re in the dark about why , exactly, we ’ re paid what we are, most of us think we ’ re getting underpaid.

Nearly 90 per cent of people who think they're underpaid are actually getting at or near the market rate, a new survey has found.© Tanya Lake Nearly 90 per cent of people who think they're underpaid are actually getting at or near the market rate, a new survey has found. You're probably getting paid better than you think you are. If only you knew it.

Whether our jobs pay us fairly matters a lot less to us than how well we feel we're getting paid, a new survey has found - and because we're in the dark about why, exactly, we're paid what we are, most of us think we're getting underpaid.

In reality, nearly 90 per cent of people who think they're underpaid are actually getting at or near the market rate, a new survey by the online salary database PayScale has found.

This is how Maile Carnegie ended up being paid more than her boss ANZ CEO Shayne Elliott

  This is how Maile Carnegie ended up being paid more than her boss ANZ CEO Shayne Elliott Maile Carnegie, the former head of Google Australia who defected to run digital at the ANZ Bank, was the bank's highest paid senior executive last year.According to the ANZ's annual report, Carnegie was paid $4,344,169 in 2017 while Elliott got a little less at $4,261,588.

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But people who think their employers are fair and transparent in how they determine pay are more likely to be happy at work than those actually paid the going rate for their jobs.

In its survey, PayScale collected salaries and corresponding market rates for the jobs of more than 500,000 people, then asked respondents to rate a series of statements - including ones about job satisfaction and employers' pay, transparency and fairness - on a scale from one to five.

Those confident in the fairness and transparency of their employers' pay processes, the survey found, were 5.4 times more likely than people paid a market rate to be highly satisfied with their jobs.

"Companies are determining pay in this kind of behind-the-curtain way," said Chris Martin, the lead data analyst at PayScale. "Employees are forming opinions and think they are getting a raw deal."

This is how Maile Carnegie ended up being paid more than her boss ANZ CEO Shayne Elliott

  This is how Maile Carnegie ended up being paid more than her boss ANZ CEO Shayne Elliott Maile Carnegie, the former head of Google Australia who defected to run digital at the ANZ Bank, was the bank's highest paid senior executive last year.According to the ANZ's annual report, Carnegie was paid $4,344,169 in 2017 while Elliott got a little less at $4,261,588.

Whether our jobs pay us fairly matters a lot less to us than how well we feel we ’ re getting paid , a new survey has found—and because we ’ re in the dark about why , exactly, we ’ re paid what we are, most of us think we ’ re getting underpaid.

Employers determine pay using a variety of factors, some of them highly subjective. Advocates for women and people of colour have pushed transparency as one way to close gender and racial pay gaps, letting people know when they're paid less than their colleagues and forcing employers to confront their own inequities. Some states and cities have barred employers from asking job candidates what they were paid at previous jobs, lest their new salaries perpetuate earlier unfairness.

By examining their pay processes, some companies have found, and corrected, pay gaps. In an internal audit, Salesforce found pay disparities and had to adjust around 6 per cent of employees' salaries to make up for unexplained differences.

A few companies have gone further, making all their employees' pay completely public. One such employer is Buffer, a social media management platform, which publishes salaries for anyone to see and explains what variables determine them with a pay calculator.

How to get more mobile phone data for less

  How to get more mobile phone data for less A mobile phone price war is raging, with fresh data deals offering users more for less all while avoiding bill shock. Consumer experts Canstar Blue told 9NEWS pre-paid deals are the new lead market leaders.“People want low cost options they don't want to be paying a hundred dollars a month for their phone plan,” Harrison Astbury from Canstar said.“Pre-paid is the ultimate plan for flexibility.”Coles has just released one of the cheapest on the market – three gigabytes of data for $20 a month. The allowance lasts for 35 days instead of the standard 28.

We could, of course, follow his advice and just keep our heads down. Or we could insist upon working less without caring less about work. Exercises like these shepherd us beyond the world of total work, helping us to remember why we ’ re here.

blog 'amybrown.blogdetik.com' is not exists. California Real Estate: How To Pay Significantly Less Than Your Neighbors

Still, the move to transparency has been limited. Just 6 per cent of the 7,700 employers PayScale surveyed said they publish everyone's salaries; a full half of all the employers said they tell employees only what's on their paycheques.

Earlier this year, Citigroup shareholders voted with management and rejected a proposal to analyse and publicise the bank's gender-pay gap.

Natasha Lamb, a managing partner at Arjuna Capital, has made similar proposals to five other financial companies, but none has bitten.

The new survey findings suggest resistant employers have something to gain from demystifying what they pay their workers though, said Martin: "This is a way for organisations to develop this deeper level of trust."

Pictures: 20 jobs that no longer exist

2. Town crier: <p>“The British are coming! The British are coming!”</p><p>OK, so Paul Revere was actually a silversmith, albeit one with patriotic pursuits, but there once were people whose job it was to make public announcements every day in the street.</p><p>Now, with social media, everyone has a platform to make public announcements, but making a living from it is a challenge. If you think you have things the public needs to know, consider: <a href=“11 Keys to a Successful Freelance Career.”

" src="/upload/images/real/2017/11/13/2-town-crier-p-the-british-are-coming-the-british-are-coming-p-p-ok-so-paul-revere-was-actually-a-si_930760_.jpg" /> 20 jobs that no longer exist Slideshow provided by Money Talks News

International student sacked for asking for legal hours and rates of pay .
The first time international student Amy (not her real name) was sacked from a job was when she was too busy with her studies to work more than 20 hours per week as required by her boss late last year. After going back to work for the same employer earlier this year, she was sacked a second time for asking to be paid penalty rates for working on a public holiday.As a student on a temporary migrant visa, Amy, from South America, is legally only allowed to work 20 hours per week.She said her boss required her to work between 40 to 50 hours per week in breach of her visa conditions.

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