The page you are looking for is temporarily unavailable.
Please try again later

Health Dentists Mysteriously Dying of Lung Disease

05:16  11 march  2018
05:16  11 march  2018 Source:   newsweek.com

Nuts may be key to fighting this common cancer

  Nuts may be key to fighting this common cancer <p>Tree nuts — such as almonds, walnuts, hazelnuts, cashews and pecans — may hold the key to beating colon cancer.</p><p></p><p></p>So says a new Yale study in which people who’d had colon cancer and regularly eat tree nuts — such as almonds, walnuts, hazelnuts, cashews and pecans — are at “significantly lower risk” for the disease recurring than those who don’t.

Health officials are trying to figure out why dentists are dying after discovering a strange pattern in cases of a lung disease . The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported that an analysis of patients at a Virginia care center found a high incidence of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis

Health officials are trying to figure out why dentists are dying after discovering a strange pattern in cases of a lung disease . The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported that an analysis of patients at a Virginia care center found a high incidence of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis.

a close up of a device© Provided by IBT Media Health officials are trying to figure out why dentists are dying after discovering a strange pattern in cases of a lung disease.

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported that an analysis of patients at a Virginia care centre found a high incidence of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) for dentists. Out of nearly 900 patients studied over roughly two decades,  the CDC found eight dentists and one dental technician, all men, had the disease. Seven of the patients had already died.

While that does not sound like a lot, it represents 1 percent of the total IPF patients. Meanwhile, the CDC noted, only about 0.038 percent of people living in the country are dentists.

7 of the biggest heart-health myths BUSTED

  7 of the biggest heart-health myths BUSTED Outdated assumptions have led to confusion around heart health, which is why we're dispelling these commonly mistaken cardiovascular disease myths. Starting with...MYTH 1: I’m too young to worry about heart disease"Risk factors begin accumulating as early as our 20s, so we need to be observant of our heart health at every stage of our lives," advises Heart Foundation National Spokesperson on Women's Health, Julie Anne Mitchell. It's never too early to eat well and exercise regularly to prevent obesity, type 2 diabetes and other heart disease risk factors.

33. SHARES. Share Tweet. Something mysterious is happening to US dentists . The Center for Disease Control (CDC) has found a pattern of American dentists dying from the lung disease idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. The reason why remains unknown.

WaPo (“ Dentists keep dying of this lung disease . But the common denominator of a small group of patients at a Virginia clinic over a 15-year period is worrying the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention: Eight were dentists ; a ninth was a dental technician.

“A questionnaire was administered to one of the living patients, who reported polishing dental appliances and preparing amalgams and impressions without respiratory protection,” according to the CDC. “Substances used during these tasks contained … known or potential respiratory toxicity. Although no clear etiologies for this cluster exist, occupational exposures possibly contributed.”

The investigation came after one dentist diagnosed with the lung disease alerted the CDC to the pattern at the care centre.

“Although IPF has been associated with certain occupations, no published data exist regarding IPF in dentists,” the CDC said. However, “dental personnel are exposed to infectious agents, chemicals, airborne particulates, ionizing radiation and other potentially hazardous materials. Inhalational exposures experienced by dentists likely increase their risk for certain work-related respiratory diseases.”

The best gluten-free restaurants coeliacs will love

  The best gluten-free restaurants coeliacs will love Looking to eat in? Check out Australia's top gluten-free take-away meals.1 in 70 Australian's have Coeliac disease, and 1 in 4 remain undiagnosed - it's a disease with many faces, and for some, the consequences can be deadly.

Dentists are dying of a progressive and often fatal lung disease at a much faster rate than that of the general population, according to a new report from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Home › The Lounge › Dentists Mysteriously Dying of Lung Disease . – orthopedics wearing lead forever, can’t be good for health – dentists doing back bending work – night shifts ijn ER – sitting on your Butt for 579778843 hours in rads – EMT getting stuck with needles and blood left and right.

Pulmonary fibrosis is a condition in which lung tissue becomes scarred, the U.S. National Institutes of Health explain. The thickened lung tissue makes it difficult to get oxygen into the blood, depriving crucial organs like the brain and heart.

Omega-3s Aren't So Great For Your Heart After All

  Omega-3s Aren't So Great For Your Heart After All Omega-3s were supposed to protect us all from heart disease and other health problems, but it's taken some time for the evidence to catch up with the hype around these supplements.&nbsp;What about all the other reasons you might be taking omega-3s? Bad news: Major reviews have concluded that there's little evidence that omega-3s are helpful for dementia, depression, inflammatory bowel disease, or age-related macular degeneration, all of which were at one point thought to be potential benefits of the supplements.

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is trying to figure out why dentists are dying after discovering a strange pattern in cases of a lung

www.newsweek.com/ dentists - mysteriously - dying - lung - disease Health officials have found a mysterious pattern of dentists dying from the lung disease idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. CDC identifies a mystery cluster of deaths among dentists

When doctors cannot find a cause for the scarring condition, it is known as being idiopathic. Experts still do not have a full understanding of what causes the disease, and it kills many patients between three and five years after they are diagnosed.

Officials also still do not know what caused the cluster of dentists with the illness.

“Although the etiology of IPF is unknown, exposures that have been suggested as contributing factors include viral infections, cigarette smoking, and occupations where exposure to dust, wood dust, and metal dust are common,” the CDC said.

Signs of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis include shortness of breath, a chronic and dry cough, weight loss, fatigue, joint and muscle pains and clubbed fingers or toes.

“We do work with materials and with human bioproducts that are potentially damaging to our bodies if we inhale them,” the chief policy officer of the American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry’s Pediatric Oral Health & Research Center, Dr. Paul Casamassimo, told CNN.

Slideshow: 13 symptoms of serious health matters

13 Symptoms of Serious Health Matters 13 Symptoms of Serious Health Matters

Dentists say brushing teeth twice a day is important, but when exactly? .
We teach children to brush their teeth twice a day, and hopefully we're all still doing that as adults. But when exactly should that brushing happen?&nbsp;But when exactly should that brushing happen?

—   Share news in the SOC. Networks

Topical videos:

This is interesting!